HEARST MEDIA PUBLICATIONS

THE ART DOESN'T HAVE TO MATCH THE SOFA, July 8, 2017, Joel Lang

Amie Appleton Greenspan of Westport, whose Appleton Art Design has garnered several Best of Houzz awards, believes art and decor is not an either/or proposition.

“A piece can be decorative and contain substance. Pieces I would classify as decorative are those that only hold the viewer’s interest momentarily. Your eyes see it, but move past it,” she says. Art with substance “will hold your eyes longer,” compelling attention.

Greenspan, who got a law degree after studying art history and anthropology in college, sees herself as part concierge and part curator. She takes pride in working with a roster of artists whose work rewards both aesthetically and conceptually; work that in one way or another conveys substance.

Elusive and subjective, substance is what Greenspan sometimes calls the “art part” of the buying equation. “The art part is what speaks to (clients) when they just look,” she says. “The design part is more technical in terms of working with the rest of the room, size-wise, color-wise and texture-wise.”

Greenspan says people should see as much art as they can, but not buy until they see how a piece fits in their home, which reflects her own curatorial preferences. “If I can’t live with it, I don’t expect my clients to live with it either,” she says.

NEW CANAAN AND DARIEN MAGAZINE, MOFFLY MEDIA

TRUE ORIGINAL, March/April 2015

PUT ART FIRST. Although many decorators seeks out art to finish a space, Amie Greenspan of Westport-based Appleton Art Design says think of it first. "It may actually trim your budget for other accessories, or influence how you select them; and it may positively influence the overall design direction."

MIX IT UP. It's okay to let artistic originals share space with more pedestrian pieces. "My job is all about editing. I help you mix something new with the posters in the kitchen and the photos in the living room," says Greenspan.

AT HOME MAGAZINE, MOFFLY MEDIA

ARTS + ANTIQUES TODAY, May/June 2014

We asked three dealers with an eye for wonderful things for advice on finding the right piece to enhance and complete a room. "Look actively and listen to your instincts. The right piece will ignite an emotional connection," says Amie, who owns Appleton Art Design in Westport, offering modern, postmodern and contemporary art. As a complementary service, she consults with clients on the placement of new pieces, reconfiguring existing art when needed.

NEW ENGLAND HOME MAGAZINE

FRIDAY FAVORITES, August 9, 2013, Stacy Kunstel

Contrast and texture are key in Lawrence McGarvey's work that I spotted in Amie Greenspan's Appleton Art Design gallery in Westport, Conn. This particular piece, a black-and-white image of coral on Plexiglas, appears both organic and modern at the same time. While his work encompasses different and brighter colors, the drama of the stark black and white attracted me the most.

CONNECTICUT COTTAGES AND GARDENS

MATCH MAKER, October 2012, Ann Loynd

Appleton Art Design, a gallery designed to actively source artwork to the interior design trade, will have its official opening October 5. Owner Amie Greenspan aims to provide professionals with pieces that complement their tastes.

NEW ENGLAND HOME MAGAZINE

WHAT WHEN WHERE, September 17, 2012, Lisa E. Harrison

Sometimes, when one person decides to pursue her passion, we all benefit. Such is the case with Amie Appleton Greenspan’s latest venture, Appleton Art Design—a gorgeous new gallery in Westport, Conn.

Greenspan, an attorney who’s repped businesses in the fashion, art and design world, studied art history in college and has had a longstanding interest in art and design.

The gallery specializes in contemporary art (works on canvas, paper and Plexiglas, in oil, acrylic, watercolors and pastels, as well as photography), and Greenspan is currently collaborating with a talented troupe of well-known and emerging artists, many of whom haven’t been represented in the area. Her approach is very personal: “I select artwork that resonates with color and texture, and appeals to my sense of design,” she says.

Greenspan sells directly to the design trade and the general public by appointment only. Most of the artwork falls between $1,000 and $4,000. “I have found that there is a need for original and accessible design-oriented art,” she says. “I have also discovered that many artists with great talent are not adequately represented by traditional galleries. My gallery aims to bring these interests and needs together.”

A goal we can all get behind indeed.